3under30

DANIEL BLAU | Photo Competition “3 under 30“ until June 14th 2021

 
Following on the success of last year’s 3 Under 30 competition, which attracted numerous submissions from artists around the world. DANIEL BLAU is pleased to announce the return of this prestigious competition for young photographers.This is a unique opportunity to gain recognition through an internationally renowned gallery.Three photographers will be selected based on the strengths of a submitted portfolio and accompanying statement.
 
The three winners will be exhibited in a group show organised and publicised by DANIEL BLAU.
 
The exhibition will take place in Paris in November 2021 as part of the Photo-St-Germain festival.The competition is open to submissions from May 1st – June 14th, 2021.
 
Applicants will complete a short application followed by a postal submission of photographs.
 
All photographers aged 29 and under on the competition closing date of June 14th, 2021 are eligible to apply.
 
The winners will be announced on August 15th, 2021.
 
Submission Form


Traveling by Autochrome

Glaciers are among the most beautiful natural wonders on Earth.
 

Traveling by Autochrome

Glaciers are among the most beautiful natural wonders on Earth. For most of us, though, they also remain deeply unknown and misunderstood. Glacial ice has shaped the landscape over millions of years by scouring away rocks, transporting and depositing debris far from its source. Glacial meltwater drives turbines and irrigates deserts, yielding mineral-rich soils and leaving us a wealth of valuable sand and gravel. Our future is bound up closely, if indirectly, with the future of glaciers, and with the impact of their fate on our global climate and sea levels.

 

In 1914, a world’s fair was held in south of France – the Exposition international urbaine de Lyon.
 
The site of the fair sprawled across 184 acres of Lyon’s 7th arrondissement, including the grand Garnier exhibition hall, an imitation alpine village, a horticultural garden, a dedicated pavilion for the city’s famous silk industry, and international pavilions for both foreign nations and France’s overseas colonies. The last day was scheduled for November 1st, but history intervened. The outbreak of World War I forced the closure of the Austrian and German pavilions on August 2nd, and many of the fair’s other delegations left soon afterwards. The Exposition managed to remain open until November, as planned; by the time it officially ended, though, much of the once-proud fairgrounds had been empty for weeks.

 
 

Sources:

Sources:
Michael Hambrey, Jürg Alean, “Glaciers”, Cambridge University Press 2004.
Exposition international urbaine de Lyon

 
 

 
All photographs are available for purchase. Prices upon request. For further information please send an email to: contact@danielblau.com
All offers are noncommital. We cannot guarantee the items are still available on request.
 

Fred P. Clatworthy, "Aspen Trees on Mt. Side", 1952, Kodachrome, 12,4 x 17,5 cm, © Fred P. Clatworthy, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Fred P. Clatworthy, “Aspen Trees on Mt. Side”, 1952, Kodachrome, 12,4 x 17,5 cm, © Fred P. Clatworthy, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Louis Alphonse Poitevin

Louis Alphonse Poitevin

DANIEL BLAU is pleased to present Louis Alphonse Poitevin, an exhibition honoring an outstanding inventor, chemist, engineer, researcher, artist and photographer, and one of the most important characters in the development of photography as we know it today.
 
For more than 35 years, Louis Alphonse Poitevin (1819-1882) experimented with chemical and mechanical processes in search of a printable and longer-lasting photograph. He recognized early on that photography had the potential to revolutionize how mass-produced books were illustrated. His work brought that revolution about, creating the first practical process for printing photographs, as illustrations within books, on an industrial scale.
 
This exhibition of Alphonse Poitevin’s work, featuring 47 rare photographs, offers the opportunity for an in-depth view into some of his most prescient inventions. Poitevin is remembered today most for establishing the fundamental principles of four non-silver process families: photolithography, collotype, dichromate relief systems, and the carbon pigment process.

 

Exhibition until June 2021
 
For your visit, please make an appointment in advance by contacting us via phone or email
 
11am – 6pm | mon – fri
Maximilianstraße 26, 80539 München

 

 
All artworks are available for purchase. Prices upon request. For further information please send an email to: contact@danielblau.com

Louis Alphonse Poitevin

Louis Alphonse Poitevin (1819-1882)

Louis Alphonse Poitevin was born in the small town of Conflans-sur-Anille, halfway between Paris and Nantes, on August 30, 1819. After graduating from school in 1838, he moved to Paris to study chemistry at the École Centrale des Arts et Manufacture. In 1839, the discovery of the daguerreotype was announced at the Académie des sciences, and Poitevin became immediately hooked on photography. He purchased a camera and the necessary utensils for this new art and began making daguerreotypes in his free time.
 
Poitevin left the École Centrale just as France was entering the era of industrialisation, and from 1844 on he was quickly able to find employment as a chemical engineer. Over the next 30 years, he worked in salt and copper mines and glassware factories all over France and even in Algeria. At these locations, and in bouts between assignments, he dedicated his spare time to the study and invention of new photographic processes, in a constant quest for improving working practices and achieving successful results, an approach he also applied to his professional engineering tasks. He was extremely versatile in his projects, inventing both photomechanical and photochemical processes. The former include early methods of converting daguerreotype images into printing matrixes, the first successful photolithographic process, and explorations into the fundamentals of the later invented collotype. The latter combined both positives and negatives, on paper, glass, and even ceramics.
 
With his photolithographic technique of 1855, Poitevin won the much sought after Grand prix du Duc de Luynes in 1867, a contest run by the Societé française de photographie designed to stimulate research into developing a photomechanical process for the photographic illustration of publications. He also won a number of prizes for his non-silver photographic techniques, including a gold medal at the International Exposition in Paris in 1878. He held five patents, and his book “Traité des impressions photographiques” was published twice: the first edition in 1862 and a posthumous second edition in 1883. He published over 80 technical articles in professional journals of photography and printing. Poitevin died on March 4, 1882, in the village of his birth, leaving behind his wife Sophie (née Pequegnot), whom he had married in 1865.
 
Text by: Martin Jürgens, 2021
 
 
See recent publication “Louis Alphonse Poitevin”

Autochrome Photographers

Auguste (1862-1954) and Louis (1864-1948) Lumière
The Lumière Autochrome, invented by Auguste (1862-1954) and Louis (1864-1948) Lumière, was the first practical and commercially viable process of color photography. After ten years of research and experimentation, the Lumière firm introduced the first Autochrome plate to the world in 1907. The Brothers Lumière were also the inventors of the Cinémathographe, patented on February 13, 1895. France’s first public film screening, in front of a paying audience, took place on December 28 of the same year.
 
Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946)
Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946) was more than just a photographer: an enormously influential gallerist, he introduced the European avant-garde and their works to the world of contemporary American art. In 1903 he founded the annual magazine Camera Work, which contained critiques and reproductions of avant-garde artists alongside photographs. Matisse, Cézanne, Rodin, and Braque, among others, all exhibited at Galerie 291, founded by Stieglitz and Edward Steichen in 1905.

 

Ellis Kelsey (1866-1939)
Ellis Kelsey (1866-1939), who had been moonlighting as a photographer since 1889, turned to the Lumière Autochrome as soon as it was released, in 1907. By 1908 he was already able to show eight pieces, his first color photographic work, in exhibition at the Royal Photographic Society in London.

 

Samuel Gottscho (1875-1971)
The photographs of Samuel Gottscho (1875-1971) expose a particular fondness for architecture, landscape, nature, and countryside living. Despite dabbling in the art since 1896, it was only at the age of fifty that his hobby became a career. His photographs appeared in the pages – and even graced the covers – of American Architect and Architecture, Architectural Record, The New York Times, not to mention numerous home decoration magazines.

 

Louis and August Lumière, "Oiseau Empaillé", c. 1897, stereo Lumière trichrome, 18 x 8,5 cm, © Louis and August Lumière, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Louis and August Lumière, “Oiseau Empaillé”, c. 1897, stereo Lumière trichrome, 18 x 8,5 cm, © Daniel Blau, Munich
Louis Alphonse Poitevin

Louis Alphonse Poitevin

 

Poitevin – The Rediscovery of an Alchemist

Daniel Blau is pleased to present Louis Alphonse Poitevin: outstanding inventor, chemist,
engineer, researcher, artist and photographer.
For more than 35 years Poitevin (1819-1882) experimented with chemical and mechanical processes to make photographic images printable and durable. Poitevin recognized early on
how important photography would be to illustrate printed books. He developed the first applicable methods, the implementation of which made the printing of photographically
illustrated books possible in the first place. Presenting 47 rare photographs, this exhibition of Alphonse Poitevin’s work offers the opportunity for an in-depth view into some of his most prescient inventions in photography.
Poitevin is remembered today most for establishing the fundamental principles of four nonsilver process families: photolithography, collotype, dichromate relief systems, and the carbon pigment process. His inventions refined existing techniques and made the mechanical reproduction of images and thus, the illustration of printed books, possible.
 
The publication offers the unique opportunity to take a comprehensive look at the life and work of the famous pioneer of photography using a large number of different photographs
and the latest cutting-edge-technology research results. The volume brings together photographs and the results of experiments that provide a comprehensive insight into Poitevin’s work and place his achievements in both a technical and an art-historical context.
 
Alphonse Poitevin here at last receives some of the attention he deserves.
 
 
 

Available to order!

Editor:
Daniel Blau
Maximilianstr. 26
80539 Munich
 
Published by:
Hirmer Publishers
Bayerstr. 57-59
80335 Munich
 

Printed and bound by Pelo-Druck Lohner oHG
Paper content: Tauro 120 g/m2
Paper cover: Flexcover, Gardamatt 350g/m2
84 pages, 97 illustrations
25,0×18,5cm, softcover
ISBN: 978-3-7774-3747-7
 
€ 29,90
 
Published: 2021
 
Copyright: all illustrations © Daniel Blau, Munich
 
Text: Martin Jürgens, Katharina Rohmeder

Layout: Christiane Wunsch

Editor: Robert Isaf
 

Order your copy exclusivly here: contact@danielblau.com
or via Hirmer Publishers
 
 

The Art of the Autochrome

The Lumière Autochrome, invented and marketed by brothers Auguste and Louis Lumière,
was the world’s first practical color photography process.

 

The Art of the Autochrome

Even from the moment of photography’s invention, the absence of color was recognized as one of its greatest shortcomings. The development of color photography became one of photomechanical research’s primary goals over the course of the 19th century. The photosensitive material in use at the time did in fact register the wavelengths of different colors in our visible spectrum when recording an image – there simply wasn’t a way to directly reproduce that color. Once it was understood that a simple re-creation of color wouldn’t be possible, the technical pioneers and inventors of the time searched for another method, for a way to deconstruct the colors of reality and reassemble them again by scientific means.

 

The Lumière Autochrome, invented and marketed by brothers Auguste and Louis Lumière, was the world’s first practical color photography process. The trichrome (publicised a few years earlier) was the first commercially available color process. It was complicated to use, as three separate pictures had to be taken of the same object through different color filters. Thus the autochrome became the first practical color process. After ten years of intensive research and development, the Lumière company introduced the first autochrome plates in 1907. The color pictures that resulted were on glass plates, and viewed as transparencies. They consisted of a color screen superimposed upon a black-and-white positive, which modulated the light passing through the color screen. While more modern color techniques – even those which also resulted in transparencies as the final product – exclusively used subtractive color processes, the Autochrome stands apart for employing additive color.

 

We can narrow the use of Autochrome photography down to a relatively precise period of fifty years: from the commercialization of the process by the Lumière Brothers (1907) until the final end of the technology’s production (1956/57). Its importance, however, had already experienced a significant decline by the end of the 1920s. A turning point came in 1931, when Lumière replaced glass plates with celluloid sheet film (Filmcolor) as its commercially available capture medium. After 1936, Autochrome had to contend with competition in the form of subtractive color process, from Kodak (Kodachrome) and Agfa (Agfacolor), which began gradually replacing Autochrome plates on the market.

 

A glass plate would first be coated with tiny, transparent grains of potato starch that had been dyed in the additive primary colors – red, green, and blue. These dyed grains were mixed and spread in even proportions over the plate, which as a result appeared gray when white light was shined through. The spaces between the grains were filled by a carbon black dye. A final coat, of a black-and-white photographic emulsion, came on top of that. When the photographer placed the plate in the camera, this final coat of emulsion was furthest away from the lens; when the lens was opened, light had to pass through the glass plate and through the colored grains before reaching the emulsion, although it was this emulsion that we actually talk about as being ‘exposed.’

 

Instead of being processed as a normal black-and-white negative, the plate would be subjected to a procedure known as reversal processing: the negative is developed, the developed silver is bleached out before an image is permanently fixed, and finally any remaining silver salts are developed in turn, producing a positive image. Once the plate had been processed and dried, it could be viewed as a transparency, appearing as a photograph in full color.
The Autochrome worked because the positive image – even though monochromatic – acted to modulate the amount of light that went through each grain of dyed starch. In a red area of the picture, for example, a lot of light would have passed through the red grains onto the coating of black-and-white emulsion when the picture was taken. The positive was lightly shaded in that area, so a lot of light would also pass through the red grains when the final transparency was viewed. The green grains in that same area would have blocked the red light when the exposure was made; less light, therefore, would have reached the plate at that place, making that part of the positive darker as well, so that the green grains, when viewed later, were “turned off” by the heavy deposit of silver behind them. In controlling the intensity of the three additive primaries, the Autochrome worked exactly the same way as the modern television or computer screen.
 

The brightness range of the Autochrome was limited for two reasons: the black matrix in which the grains were dispersed reduced the overall transmission of light, and saturated colors could only be achieved by diminishing the brightness of other colors. To make a strong blue, the red and green grains would have to be darkened, so saturated areas appeared as less bright, giving the Autochrome a tonal scale unlike that of any other process.
Part of what makes these early color photographs so fascinating for today’s audience is the unique perspective they offer, a glimpse into a period of humanity’s history we’re accustomed to seeing only in black and white – and that, in turn, we’ve grown used to imagining only in black and white as well. Just as the men and women of the early 20th century would have been amazed to see the world around them in such vivid mechanical reproduction for the first time, we in the 21st century find cause for astonishment too, not now in the colors of the present but the colors of the past.

 

Sources:

Richard Benson, “The Printed Picture”, published by The Museum of Modern Art, New York 2009.
John Wood, “The Art of the Autochrome. The Birth of Color Photography”, Iowa 1993.
Bertrand Lavédrine, Jean-Paul Gandolfo, “The Lumière Autochrome. History, Technology, and Preservation”, Los Angeles 2013.
André Barret, “Autochromes. 1906/1928”, Paris 1978.
Hanno Platzgummer, “Farben aus der Dunkelkammer. Die Autochrome des Franz Bertolini. 1908-1925”. Innsbruck 1996.

 
 

 
All photographs are available for purchase. Prices upon request. For further information please send an email to: contact@danielblau.com
All offers are noncommital. We cannot guarantee the items are still available on request.
 

Louis and August Lumière, "Oiseau Empaillé", c. 1897, stereo Lumière trichrome, 18 x 8,5 cm, © Louis and August Lumière, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Louis and August Lumière, “Oiseau Empaillé”, c. 1897, stereo Lumière trichrome, 18 x 8,5 cm, © Louis and August Lumière, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Of Demons, Spirits and Other Creatures

 
‘Demon’ comes from the Greek δαίμων or δαιμόνιον.
 

Of Demons, Spirits and Other Creatures

“Nicht lange brauch ich zu beschwören,
Schon raschelt eine hier und wird sogleich mich hören.
Der Herr der Ratten und der Mäuse,
Der Fliegen, Frösche, Wanzen, Läuse
Befiehlt dir, dich hervor zu wagen
Und diese Schwelle zu benagen,
So wie er sie mit Öl betupft-
Da kommst du schon hervorgehupft!”
 
To conjure up a lengthier spell,
One’s rustling here that will do well.
The Lord of Rats and Mice,
Of Flies, Frogs, Bugs and Lice,
Summons you to venture here,
And gnaw the threshold where
He stains it with a little oil –
You’ve hopped, already, to your toil!
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, “Faust. Part I”
 

“I have also proposed certain theses concerning magic, in which I have indicated that magic has two forms. One consists wholly in the operations and powers of demons, and consequently this appears to me, as God is my witness, an execrable and monstrous thing. The other proves, when thoroughly investigated, to be nothing else but the highest realization of natural philosophy. The Greeks noted both these forms. However, because they considered the first form wholly undeserving the name magic they called it goeteia, reserving the term mageia, to the second, and understanding by it the highest and most perfect wisdom. The term “magus” in the Persian tongue, according to Porphyry, means the same as “interpreter” and “worshipper of the divine” in our language. […] The former is vain and disappointing; the later, firm, solid and satisfying. […] Plotinus also gives signs that he was aware of it in the passage in which he shows that the magician is the minister of nature and not merely its artful imitator. […] That first form of magic cannot justify any claim to being either an art or a science while the latter, filled as it is with mysteries, embraces the most profound contemplation of the deepest secrets of things and finally the knowledge of the whole of nature. This beneficent magic, in calling forth, as it were, from their hiding places into the light the powers which the largess of God has sown and planted in the world, does not itself work miracles, so much as sedulously serve nature as she works her wonders. Scrutinizing, with greater penetration, that harmony of the universe which the Greeks with greater aptness of terms called sympatheia and grasping the mutual affinity of things, she applies to each thing those inducements (called the iugges of the magicians), most suited to its nature. Thus it draws forth into public notice the miracles which lie hidden in the recesses of the world, in the womb of nature, in the storehouses and secret vaults of God, as though she herself were their artificer. As the farmer weds his elms to the vines, so the “magus” unites earth to heaven, that is, the lower orders to the endowments and powers of the higher.”

“[…] Proposuimus et magica theoremata, in quibus duplicem esse magiam significavimus, quarum altera demonum tota opere et auctoritate constat, res medius fidius execranda et portentosa. Altera nihil est aliud, cum bene exploratur, quam naturalis philosophiae absoluta consumatio. Utriusque cum meminerint Greci, illam magiae nullo modo nomine dignantes [goeteian] nuncupant, hanc propria peculiarique appellatione [mageian], quasi perfectam summamque sapientiam vocant. Idem enim, ut ait Porphyrius, Persarum lingua magus sonat quod apud nos divinorum interpres et cultor. […] illa irrita et vana, haec firma fidelis et solida. […] Meminit et Plotinus, ubi naturae ministrum esse et non artificiem magum demonstrat […] Illa denique nec artis nec scientiae sibi potest nomen vendicare; haec altissimis plena misteriis, profundissimam rerum secretissimarum contemplationem, et demum totius naturae cognitionem complectitur. Haec, inter sparsas Dei beneficio et inter seminatas mundo virtutes, quasi de latebris evocans in lucem, non tam facit miranda quam facienti naturae sedula famulatur. Haec universi consensum, quem significantius Graeci [sumpatheian] dicunt, introrsum perscrutatius rimata et mutuam naturarum cognitionem habens perspectatam, nativas adibens unicuique rei et suas illecebras, quae magorum [iunges] nominantur, in mundi recessibus, in naturae gremio, in promptuariis arcanisque Dei latitantia miracula, quasi ipsa sit artifex, promit in publicum, et sicut agricola ulmos vitibus, ita magus terram caelo, idest inferiora superiorum dotibus virtutibusque maritat. […]”

excerpt from: Giovanni Pico della Mirandola,
“Oration on the Dignity of Men”, 1486
 

 
Good to know
‘Demon’ comes from the Greek δαίμων or δαιμόνιον. Both refer, according to Thales of Miletus – the pre-Socratic natural philosopher – to a universal spirit within all things. When Socrates uses it, he means, thereby, the conscience. The Neoplatonists returned to the set of beliefs and superstitions, widespread among the common folk, of δαιμόνια as natural spirits. Their lead was followed by Augustine, for whom δαιμόνια were both helpful and malevolent spirits. Ulfilias translated δαιμόνιον into German as ‘unhulto’ (Modern German ‘Unhold’, or ‘fiend’); Luther translated it as ‘devil.’

 

“I saw a lustful woman, naked and stripped of flesh, red from revolting boils, her corpse gorged upon by snakes, and beside her a barrel-bellied Satyr with fur-coated gryphon claws and an obscene grimace, shrieking out its own damnation; and I saw a covetous man, stiff in death’s stiffness on a sumptuous chaise longue, now cowardly quarry of a host of demons, one tearing out from his rattling mouth his soul, a soul in the shape of a small child (oh, never shall there be for him a resurrection to eternal life!); and I saw a proud man, a nightmarish elf perched upon his shoulder and raking away at his eyes with craggy talons, and I saw more demons, even more, goat-headed, lion-maned, panther-mawed, trapped in a forest of flames whose burning stench I could have sworn I felt in my nostrils and lungs.”
Umberto Eco, “The Name of the Rose”

 
Sources:

Bible Server
RDK Labor “Dämonen”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe “Faust 1”
Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463-94) “Oration on the Dignity of Man (1486)
The Latin Library

 
 

 
All artworks are available for purchase. Prices upon request. For further information please send an email to: contact@danielblau.com
All offers are noncommital. We cannot guarantee the items are still available on request.
 
Bill Bragg,"Boxheads in the Woods“, 2011, water color on paper, 75,9x56,0 cm, ©Bill Bragg
Bill Bragg,”Boxheads in the Woods“, 2011, watercolor on paper, 75,9×56,0 cm, ©Bill Bragg
resistance
“Es bleibt ein unumstößliches Gesetz der Geschichte, daß sie gerade den Zeitgenossen versagt, die großen Bewegungen, die ihre Zeit bestimmen, schon in ihren ersten Anfängen zu erkennen.”

“It remains an indisputable historical law that history will not allow contemporaries to recognize the first stirrings of the great movements which define their era.”

Stefan Zweig, “Die Welt von Gestern” (“The World of Yesterday”)
“Quant aux gens que j’accuse, je ne les connais pas, je ne les ai jamais vus, je n’ai contre eux ni rancune ni haine. Ils ne sont pour moi que des entités, des esprits de malfaisance sociale. Et l’acte que j’accomplis ici n’est qu’un moyen révolutionnaire pour hâter l’explosion de la vérité et de la justice.”

“As for the people I am accusing, I do not know them, I have never seen them, and I bear them neither resentment nor hatred. To me they are mere entities, spirits of social evil. And the act I am accomplishing here is no more than a revolutionary way to hasten the explosion of truth and justice.”

Émile Zola, “Letter to Mr. Félix Faure. President of the Republic” in: L’Aurore, January 13, 1898

Front page cover of the newspaper L'Aurore for Thursday, January 13, 1898, with Émile Zola's open letter about the Dreyfus affair, source: Wikimedia Commons
Front page cover of the newspaper L’Aurore for Thursday, January 13, 1898, with Émile Zola’s open letter about the Dreyfus affair, source: Wikimedia Commons
caption verso:
Hitler Starts Drive to Capture Reichstag Majority.
Before a frantically cheering crowd which packed the huge sportspalast in Berlin, Feb. 10, chancellor Adolf Hitler, firing the opening gun in his drive to capture a Reichstag majority in the election March 5, blamed socialist governments for all of Germany’s ills. He is shown here delivering his fiery speech in the Sportspalast.
Unidentified German Photographer (Associated Press Photo), "Hitler Starts Drive to Capture Reichstag Majority", February 10, 1933, 16,7 (17,9) x 21,2 (22,8) cm, silver gelatin print on glossy fibre paper with collaged spot recto (bottom center), printed by February 20, 1933, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified German Photographer (Associated Press Photo), “Hitler Starts Drive to Capture Reichstag Majority”, February 10, 1933,© Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
“Die große Arbeitslosigkeit, die der wirtschaftlichen folgende seelische Depression, die Sucht sich zu betäuben, die Aktivität bedenkenloser Parteien, das waren die Sturmzeichen der nahenden Krise. Und auch die unheimliche Stille vor dem Sturm fehlte nicht, – die einer epidemischen Lähmung gleichende Trägheit der Herzen. Es trieb manche, sich dem Sturm und der Stille entgegenzustellen. Sie wurden beiseitegeschoben. Lieber hörte man Jahrmarktschreiern und Trommlern zu, die ihre Senfpflaster und Patentlösungen anpriesen. Man lief ihnen nach, hinein in den Abgrund, in dem wir nun, mehr tot als lebendig, angekommen sind.”

“The high unemployment, the spiritual Depression following from the economic, the addict’s urge to numb oneself, the activity of unscrupulous parties, all of these were the signs of the coming storm. And neither was the eerie silence before the storm missing – the languor of a heart, crippled as if by epidemic. It drove some to set themselves against the storm and its stillness. They were pushed aside. People would rather listen to the hollering carnival barkers and drummers hawk their panaceas and snake oil. They ran after them, out into the abyss, in which we now, more dead than alive, have arrived.”
Erich Kästner, “Der Gang vor die Hunde” (“Going to the Dogs”), forword to new edition, Munich, Summer 1946

caption verso:
When Hitler Became Chancellor
Standing in the window at upper left, President Paul von Hindenburg silently acknowledges the cheers of thousands who journeyed to the palace to acclaim him after his appointment of Adolf Hitler as chancellor of Germany, in Berlin.
Unidentified Photographer (ACME Newspicture), "When Hitler Became Chancellor", February 7, 1933, 21,7 (22,8) x 16,9 (18,0) cm, silver gelatin print on glossy fibre paper, printed by February 14, 1933, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified Photographer (ACME Newspicture), “When Hitler Became Chancellor”, February 7, 1933, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
“So übten sie vorsichtig ihre Methode: immer nur eine Dosis und nach der Dosis eine kleine Pause. Immer nur eine einzelne Pille und dann einen Augenblick Abwartens, ob sie nicht zu stark gewesen, ob das Weltgewissen diese Dosis noch vertrage. Und da das europäische Gewissen – zum Schaden und zur Schmach unserer Zivilisation – eifrigst seine Unbeteiligtheit betonte, weil diese Gewalttaten doch ‘jenseits der Grenze’ vor sich gingen, wurden die Dosen immer kräftiger, bis schließlich ganz Europa an ihnen zugrunde ging.”

“So they carefully practiced their method: always only one dose at a time, and after that dose a short break. Always only one single pill at a time, and then a moment to wait and see if that hadn’t been too strong, if the world’s conscience could still tolerate the dosage. And as the European conscience – to the detriment and disgrace of our civilization – stressed zealously its indifference, since after all these acts of violence were happening ‘that side of the border,’ the doses grew ever stronger, until finally all of Europe perished from them.”
Stefan Zweig, “Die Welt von Gestern” (“The World of Yesterday”)
Unidentified Photographer, "Berlin Magazine Says is Last Picture of Hitler", April 20, 1945, silver gelatin print on glossy fibre paper, with gouache and crayon, printed by May 16, 1950, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified Photographer, “Berlin Magazine Says is Last Picture of Hitler”, April 20, 1945,© Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified Photographer, “Prosperina ‘Lisetta’ Vallet, a ‘Magis’ Freedom Fighter”, 1944 ©courtesy,Daniel Blau Munich
Peter Leibing, "Conrad Schumann Jumping a Barbed Wire Fence at the Berlin Wall", August 1961, silver gelatin print on glossy fibre paper, printed by May 7, 1969, 24,5 (25,7) x 34,7 (35,8), © Peter Leibing, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Peter Leibing, “Conrad Schumann Jumping a Barbed Wire Fence at the Berlin Wall”, August 1961,© Peter Leibing, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
caption verso:
An East German mother cries while saying goodbye to her daughter outside the West German Embassy in Prague, Czechoslovakia. The mother returned to East Germany Saturday, and the daughter stayed with more than 3,000 refugees who left for the West Sunday
Unidentified Photographer (AP photo), "Germany, East - Refugees", October 2, 1989, 22,4 (22,9) x 18,8 (19,7) cm, portable wire photo machine print on resin and fiber base, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified Photographer (AP photo),”Germany, East – Refugees”, October 2, 1989, portable wire photo machine print on resin and fiber base, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
caption verso:
East German citizens, using ladders built from boards, scale the walls of the West German Embassy in Prague, Czechosslovakia, in a desperate attempt to reach the first step in their bid for freedom.
Unidentified Photographer, "East German Citizens Scale the Walls of the West German Embassy in Prague", October 4, 1989, silver gelatin print on matte fibre paper, printed in 1989, 19,3 x 23,2 cm, © Unidentified Photographer , courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified Photographer, “East German Citizens Scale the Walls of the West German Embassy in Prague”, October 4, 1989, © Unidentified Photographer , courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
caption verso:
Accompanied by her boy friend, this blonde West Berlin girl stands on a precarious perch near the top of the wall to talk with her mother on the East Berlin side. While it’s just an exciting tourist attraction for many, it’s a heart-breaking “visiting room” for the enormous prison that East Berlin has become for some.
Unidentified Photographer (UPI Photo), "Pictures on the Wall", April 21, 1962, 19,3 (20,4) x 24,7 (25,6) cm, silver gelatin print on glossy fibre paper, printed by April 24, 1962, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified Photographer (UPI Photo), “Pictures on the Wall”, April 21, 1962, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
caption verso:
Break in the Barrier East Berlin: An East German border guard stands on duty at the hole in the Berlin dividing wall, which was caused by a truck attempting to break through to freedom in West Berlin. Two men in the truck which rammed the wall had to flee under a hail of bullets after the vehicle was stopped by the wall. Reports said the two men escaped on foot as the East German guards fired on them.
Unidentified Photographer (UPI Photo), "Break in the Barrier", April 16, 1962, 16,5 (18,0) x 21,8 (23,0) cm, silver gelatin print on glossy fibre paper, printed by April 24, 1962, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified Photographer (UPI Photo), “Break in the Barrier”, April 16, 1962, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
caption verso:
Berlin: West Berlin police check passes of Russians in civilian dress who are trying to enter the western sector of the city here 11/1, through checkpoint Charlie. The West Berlin police demanded all Russians in civilian dress to prove their identity before they were allowed to continue into West Berlin. The action was apparently approved by the U.S., Britain and France in retaliation for attempts by East German Communist police to restrict movement of Western Allied officials in East Berlin.
Unidentified Photographer, "Berlin", January 11, 1961, 14,0 (17,9) x 20,0 (22,8) cm, silver gelatin print on glossy fibre paper, printed by November 10, 1961, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified Photographer, “Berlin”, January 11, 1961,© Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
caption verso:
Berlin: Young children play near the Berlin Wall, on the western side. It is a wall that has brought sorrow to many, and freedom to few. Improved security procedures employed by the Communists have cut down the number of attempted and successful escapes. In the background are apartment buildings that are under construction.
Unidentified Photographer (UPI Photo), "The Berlin Wall", June 8, 1969, 24,7 (25,6) x 17,0 (20,8) cm, silver gelatin print on glossy fibre paper, printed by August 11, 1969, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
Unidentified Photographer (UPI Photo), “The Berlin Wall”, June 8, 1969, © Unidentified Photographer, courtesy Daniel Blau, Munich
 
All photographs are available for purchase. Prices upon request. For further information please send an email to: contact@danielblau.com
All offers are noncommital. We cannot guarantee the items are still available on request.
 
Demons, Spirits and other Creatures

Demons, Spirits and other Creatures

DANIEL BLAU is pleased to present a new exhibition of strange and uncanny creatures and characters, from this world or another. Featuring works by Bill Bragg, Dan McCarthy, Antonius Höckelmann, John Lurie, and Neal Fox.

 

Exhibition:
March 11 – April 20, 2021
 
For your visit, please make an appointment in advance by contacting us via phone or email
 
11am – 6pm | mon – fri
Maximilianstraße 26, 80539 München

 

 
All artworks are available for purchase. Prices upon request. For further information please send an email to: contact@danielblau.com